Make Your BRAND Stand Out From the Crowd

Today the internet represents the main source of information for most consumers and as such, a website is a business’s principle method of spreading the word and creating its unique character – its BRAND.Clearly an inadequately designed website, with a poor colour scheme and faulty navigation, sends out all sorts of messages about your business that you really do not want to send. Moreover, in a world of thousands, indeed millions of websites all selling your product (or something equivalent to it), it is easy to get lost in the maelstrom that is the World Wide Web. Good design is the only way to get your business to stand out from the crowd.Because your Brand is formed by the interaction of your products and your business’s image with your customers; it is vital that your face to face rapport is positive and the professional impression gained from those everyday business interactions, generate respect and affection for your Company and its produce. But you also need to transmit that image instantly. You don’t need to read the words Apple Computers Inc. or Toyota Cars – see their logo and directly you know who they are and what they stand for in terms of their image for design and quality. So another vital part of creating your brand identity is a well designed, immediately recognisable and memorable logo and colour scheme. The whole brand personality must permeate everything that the business shows to the world, be it business cards, letterheads, email stationery, packaging even down to distribution vans and postal wrappers.An interesting but unfortunate fact is that it can take a customer or potential customer, up to 12 exposures to your brand before the impression if fixed. So it is important to ensure that your brand stands out from the crowd and is continually repeated in every way possible, hence the website through business cards to postal wrappers mentioned above.But beyond all of this, if your brand is to succeed, the customer must be satisfied that beneath the creative logo, the attractive colour scheme and the snappy strap lines, the business is based on quality products, service excellence and the confidence that if any grievances do arise, they will be dealt with fairly and professionally.If you think your business is worth shouting about now’s the time to start shouting.

Worker Shortage Might Be Excellent News For The Economy

A worker shortage might be excellent news for the economy! Maybe, just maybe, firms will awake and see workers’ substantial contribution to their success. Some CEOs take unconscionable sums and destroy their firm’s value, unlike many frontline workers who create value. During the pandemic, CEOs took vast sums as they laid-off workers. Some firms sought bankruptcy protection, but hat didn’t stop their greedy CEOs from snatching hefty bonuses.

We have a worker shortage and firms are scrambling to hire whomever is willing. Some firms, like McDonalds have paid signing bonuses. Canada’s Loblaw and its competitors paid a bonus to frontline workers when the pandemic began. They stopped it after three months in unison with their competitors. When government confronted them about this collusion, they claimed it happened independently. Go figure! It’s like you caught your three-year-old with her hand in the cookie jar and she said, Mom, “Cookie Monster did it!”

Worker Shortage Inevitable With Shoddy Treatment

Loblaw’s behavior disturbs me. During the bonus period, profits soared. Per se, that’s no problem. I favor firms making profits. To be sure, I am against government taxing profits. But paying workers the bonus during the pandemic shouldn’t hinge on profits. It was just right. Meanwhile, my wife and I shopped at a Loblaw store and workers continued their excellent service despite Loblaw’s slight.

Leaders must realize frontline workers are the firm’s foundation and treat them well, not as cogs turning out CEOs bonuses! When employers treat workers like machines, they disengage. Gallup said, over several decades, they and other researchers found a strong link between employees’ workplace engagement and the company’s overall performance. Yet employers refuse to accept this. But there is good news: surveys show some firms break the mold and treat workers with respect: Cisco, Apple, Accenture, IBM, FedEx are a few.

Next Quarter’s Earnings Drives Businesses

Companies see next quarter as the prize, so they exploit workers and fudge next quarter’s numbers. I repeat: I am against government taxing business. However, I favor the Biden Build Back Better provision to tax share buybacks that the House passed, and it is before the Senate, even if it might have only a modest effect on share buybacks. Companies shouldn’t be spending billions buying back shares while exploiting workers.

Firms should present to shareholder meetings options to use buyback funds. Choices might include effects of paying bonuses to frontline workers with buyback funds. Shareholders should hear about potential strategic investments, too. Another option is stopping buy-backs for five years after layoffs. Executives, too, shouldn’t get bonuses within five years of layoffs. We must get rid of worker exploitation that enhances CEO bonuses.

Your Brand Is Your Number One Attraction Strategy

Do you find yourself attending a lot of tele-seminars and webinars to gain more knowledge and information to become your best, in business and life – and hoping to earn more money online? Hoping to grow your business – or even get started online.You naturally know that the more you learn, implement and execute, the more you have to give to your target audience.When you’re an expert in your field, your target audience will be come to you to buy your knowledge.Even as experts, we sometimes think we have to come up with something big to change our business – but, our market really only wants significantly good content and to connect with us.When you develop a way to connect with your target audience – you’ll find an audience that is wanting and hoping to have that connection with you. This is your market.Think about it, this is extremely important:Your business could be rocky, due to not being clear on your brand identity. This is how your market connects with you!If you analyze the businesses and brands at the top – you’ll find that they understand what they stand for.
So, get clear on what you stand for.
Discover your own uniqueness and you’ll discover your personal brand.
Sounds simple enough. But, this is a journey of discovery – and sometimes making changes along the way is an OK thing to do, it may be a required step to your business and life success.I mention business and life success because your business is an extension of your personal brand – and helps you make decisions that come from you, personally, as the business owner.So what is your personal brand all about?
What do you stand for?
How do you describe this for yourself?
Yes, the outcome of these questions will help with a mission statement and value statements – but, it will also help you make decisions on what you say yes or no to and will shape your business outcomes.As a business coach, I help others through this process. It may take a few days or weeks – keep it simple – it could be part of your brand statement process. This can be a deep and emotional connection you create with your personal brand. It is about your uniqueness.Write down what matters to you: beliefs, values, sometimes the ideas in your head may not really be yours – What you stand for is a personal connection with yourself. And this is a process of finding that out.– Once you have your list with a number of beliefs and values – cross off the ones that don’t ring true with you. Then pick the one that is what you truly stand for. What you mayYour brand is your trade name, your product – representing your leadership and integrity and it will be based on you, what you stand for. This is how you build your brand. Your brand is now a part of you.When you get clear on what you stand for, everything else will become clear for you.More often that not, for many, including myself – being an entrepreneur is a journey of clarity. It is a process of choices.I have discovered from my own experiences and I have seen this through my coaching business clients – that becoming an entrepreneur is wonderful – you get to discover so much about you. It is a fabulous chance for professional and personal development. And putting the ‘YOU’ into your business and brand.


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